Camping in Provincetown with the Boys

How did a little place at the very tip of a peninsula in Massachusetts become so well-known and come to possess such a vibrant community filled with art, beauty, and friendly people? It certainly wasn’t because of the Pilgrims. Yes, the Pilgrims. That passionately religious group who set sail from England searching for a new home so to be free of religious persecution, first landed in Provincetown’s harbor in 1620. They didn’t stay long. After not getting along with the Nauset tribe of Native Americans, five weeks after landing they pulled up anchor and sailed further north to spread their...

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Polish Fire Water

My husband Matthew and I are each half Polish and grew up eating lots of stuffed cabbage and pierogis for sure. My great grandparents came over from Poland as did Matt’s grandparents. He is only one generation removed from the old country food and traditions and grew up with them. His dad and mom shared them over the years with Matt and his four siblings. Whereas my mom and grandmother simply cooked the food, Matt’s family was following the traditional Polish Christmas Eve Wigilia and getting baskets blessed at Church during Easter. Even though today we don’t always practice the...

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This Frittata Will Travel

Anybody following my blog/recipes over the years, is probably aware of my love of Middle Eastern food. As my familiarity and interest with Middle Eastern cuisine is due to my Lebanese husband and his family, I have over the past 33 years enjoyed eating, cooking and sharing this food with family, friends and the O’Live A Little community. Turkish, Lebanese, and Persian food although different from each other, all share similarities that seem to be exotic compared to the basic American dinner of burgers and potatoes. Meat or tomatoes with mint and cinnamon, use of coriander, fenugreek, sumac and more,...

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Guinness in the Homeland

In 1759, Arthur Guinness must have been bursting with confidence and optimism when he signed a 9000 year lease (that is not typo!), for the St. James Gate Brewery in Dublin. With an annual rent of 45 pounds that was fixed for the life of the lease, in the 1770’s he began brewing a porter style beer we all know as Guinness. It was so successful that in 1799 he stopped production of other beer styles and focused solely on porter. This lease also gave him a free water supply to make his beer. Today the Guinness factory makes three...

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Don't over look the humble orange

March in New England lasts forever. Winter slowly moves into Spring, but it really isn’t until May that Mother Nature allows us to start experiencing days of some consistent warmth. It isn’t until June that the weather really turns better and the breeze changes from chilly to warm. After apple season in October, fresh fruit is gone and the great wait starts until May & June when early crops like lettuce, asparagus & strawberries are ready. My husband Matt & I love berries and usually have some in our fridge. Apart from when berries in the middle of the winter...

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Wintertime Sausage and Grapes

Like the origins of many foods, it is difficult to determine where “sausage” originally came from. Food historians believe it was being made in the Middle East during the Bronze Age (approximately 3300 BC to 1200 BC). Most cultures have their own forms and recipes. German Bratwurst, Spanish Chorizo, Polish Kielbasa, French Andouille are just a few. Add, options such as cooked, smoked, fresh and cured, you get hundreds of varieties from many cultures.In our home, Matthew my Polish-Lebanese husband is the sausage maker. His parents used to make both Polish and Italian sausage and he enjoys carrying on the...

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